WW1 in 3 minutes. A long tradition of Love and Hate

There’s a good tradition of love and hate staying by the fireside 
There’s a good tradition of love and hate staying by the fireside 

And though the rain may fall – your father’s calling you 
You still feel safe inside 
And though your ma’s too proud – your brother’s ignoring you 
You still feel safe inside 

Tanita Tikaram

Just the other day i drove through the graves of heroes. There was no roads when they were buried, maybe tracks, but no roads. Their graves remain, but their names or clan long forgotten. They were buried perhaps from two or three thousand years ago to 1747. I drove passed the house of a soldier who died on the 11th November 1918. There is a long tradition of love and hate in this part of the world. Heading south along the braes were the Devil met Dundee, i must confess I would have fought with Satan here, I’m not a fan of Bluidy Clavers. Although he won here, the Devil had his revenge a few miles down the road when the Cameronians first went into action at Dunkeld. Although no longer with us the Cameronians continued the tradition. That was not what brought me here to this picturesque wee toon. Nor was the tomb of a hero of mine, the Wolf is buried here. i came to visit a small memorial on the other side of the screen, in the nave of the Parish Kirk, which incidentally is part of the old Cathedral. The Memorial is to the Scottish Horse, brave men who were massacred at Gallipoli in a campaigned that was pointless, futile, a Churchillian Folly. They are buried in a far away land where there is still a tradition of love and hate. Dunkeld was their war station, it is here the regiment assembled on the 5th August 1914. Trained to fight in France on the Western Front, they found themselves being sent to the Dardanelles. The survivours became the 13th Battalion of the Black Watch. There is a magnificent new memorial to the Black Watch in Belgium were their memory lives on, but no such memorial exists for the Scottish Horse. They were not a sexy unit, no glorious deeds, anyway we all know Gallipoli is part of the ANZAC myth and soldiers such as the Scottish Horse never really counted or mattered.

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