Category Archives: Empire

#Folkestone #Shorncliffe on the 4th July

Americans and Folkestone in the First World War.

Fore Notes.

1)Apart from beating the Canadians at Baseball in Folkestone, there is a largely ignored history of Americans and Folkestone in the First World War.

2)Americans were American by Birth or Immigrants.

3) A large number of America enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force. On the whole, they are not included here. (Some Are)

4) A number of men born in Folkestone, such as Bertram Charles Goddard,  registered for the Draft in America. They are not included here.

5) The dates are the date of embarkation from Folkestone during the War.

6) There are some photos and, there are Footnotes.

7th October 1914

Clarence V. Mitchell an American who went to France to be a volunteer Ambulance Driver. He wrote, “With a Military Ambulance in France,” which is a collection of letters he sent to his parents. Crossed to France on the SS Sussex.1a

27th November 1914

Doctor Rose, Colin Heerle and, Ernest Percy Bicknell of the Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission embark for Flushing.1b

31st May 1915

Private G/609 James Norman Hall, an American citizen he served in the 9th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, The French, Escadrille Lafayette. , U.S. 103rd Aero Pursuit Squadron., 94th Aero Pursuit Squadron, United States Air Service., and US Aviation Head Quarters, Paris. Wrote “Kitchener’s Mob Adventures of an American in the British Army” Died 6th July 1951. (James Norman Hall War Pension record national archives Kew and The Lafayette Flying Corps, by Dennis Gordon, Schiffer 2000 ISBN 0-7643-1108-5)
15th July 1915

Dr Rudd an American Doctor embarked on the SS Sussex to work for the American Ambulance Service.

11th March 1916

Ray Baldwin, George Hollister, Philip C. Lewis2, Bert Williams, Harvard volunteer ambulance drivers for the American Ambulance Service They crossed from Folkestone to Dieppe on the “Sussex”.

26th March 1915
Ernest Percy Bicknell of the Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission3

26th December 1916

Private 11197 Fredrick James Felton, Hertfordshire Regiment4, disembarks at Calais. He arrives at 17 Infantry Base Depot, on the same day. Posted to 3rd Entrenching Battalion on the 10th January 1917. He is made “Company Clerk” and on the 1st February awarded 6d per diem additional pay. Appointed Acting Company Sergeant Major on the 30th March. Allotted a new Regimental number, 235206 in February 1917(?). Transferred to the 4th (Territorial Force) Reserve Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers and posted to the 16th Battalion on the 2nd July 1917. Joining them in the field on the 6th. He reverts to the rank of Private on completion of his duties with the 3rd Entrenching Battalion. Killed in action on the 31st July 1917. Mentioned in, The Foreign Burial of American War Dead, by Chris Dixon, as he was married to E. L. Felton, of 4056, Oakenwald Avenue, Chicago, U.S.A. Frederick is buried in Artillery Wood Cemetery, in Belgium. The inscription on his grave reads5
“THY WILL BE DONE”

28th December 1916

Private 2166A Charles Lathorp Gray, ex-4th Reinforcements/48th Battalion Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force. Crosses to Boulogne on the SS Princess Clementine. He arrives at 4th Australian Division Base Depot the next day. Taken on the Strength of 48th Battalion on the 16th February 1917. Born in Ithica, USA Charles enlisted at Adelaide, Australia on the 27th April 1916. Wounded in action in April 1917. He is medically discharged from the Australian Imperial Force on the 14th January 1918.6
Corporal 2517 Walter Theodor Hass, 48th Battalion Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force. He is killed in action 12th October, Aged 21. His brother Albert crossed to France from Folkestone on the 14th May 1917. Both have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate.
They are the sons of Peter Heinrich Hass, of Peterborough, South Australia, and the late Lisette Hass (nee Lohmann). Both were born in Greenville, Wisconsin, USA.7

31st December 1916

Private 204 Arthur Jones, Australian Imperial Force crossed to France on the SS Princess Victoria. Born in California, USA, Arthur was a pastry cook by trade. He lived in Lismore, New South Wales, Australia, on the 23rd February 1916. He embarks for England on the 17th May 1916, returns home on the 14th May 1919. Arthur is taken on the strength of the 41st Battalion ex 53rd Reinforcements/41st Battalion from 3rd (Australian) Division Base Camp on the 5th January 1917.8

4th January 1917

Driver 14865 George Thomas Bowden, Australian Engineers, Australian Imperial Force. Crossed to Boulogne on the SS Princess Clementine. Marched into the Australian General Base Depot, Etaples the same day. Transferred to 13th Field Company, Australian Engineers. on the 10th. He joins them in the field on the 12th. Born in Warwick, USA, circa 1871, George died 28th June 1949.9

16th January 1917

Private 4615 James Albert Phillips10, 45th Battalion Australian Imperial Force, crossed on the SS Princess Clementine. James is returning to his battalion after recovering from wounds. James was originally from Chicago USA.

24th January 1917

Private 2660 Richard Lindop, Ex Pioneer Training Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Taken on the strength of 4th Pioneer Battalion on the 7th March. He is killed in action on the 22nd June, age 43. Richard was the son of William and Eliza Lindop and the husband of Frances Lindop, of 1821, Cliff St., McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. And a native of Staffordshire, England.11 He is listed in The Foreign Burial of American War Dead, by Chris Dickon.

2nd February 1917

Private 2283 Francisco Aceituno, Australian Imperial Force. Born in Key West, Florida, USA. Francisco was now a farmer in Australia. He enlisted in May 1916. He crossed to France on the SS Invicta and marched into 3rd Australian Base Depot the same day. Taken on the Strength of 44th Battalion Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force ex-4th Reinforcements/44th Battalion on the 8th. It was not until May 1936 that Francisco received his medals.12

6th March 1917

Private 277330 Emile Cyr, Manchester Regiment. Emile Cyr was a sailor who enlisted at Birkenhead on the 7th August 1916. The first eight months of his army service was spent at home before he was posted to the British Expeditionary Force. Embarking from Folkestone with the 2/7th Battalion on the 6th March 1917. On the 9th October, he is at the 2/7th Field Ambulance “Sick”. Moved through the casualty evacuation chain he is transferred by hospital ship back to England on the 20th October. The next four months are spent back in the United Kingdom until on the 20th March 1918 he again embarks from Folkestone to Boulogne. After three days at “H” infantry brigade depot in Etaples, he is posted to the 2/5th Battalion Manchester Regiment and serves with them in the Field from the 6th April. Cyr is attached to 66th Division Head Quarters for a short while from the 15th May possibly followed by a stint at 199 Infantry Brigade Head Quarters, Posted to 1/5th Battalion Manchester Regiment on the 30th September he does not join them in the Field until after the Armistice on the 22nd November. Between the 30th September and the 22nd November, he spends 23 days at “H” Infantry Brigade Depot and 30 days at “K” Infantry Brigade Depot. On Christmas day 1918 he is granted 14 days leave in the United Kingdom. Shortly after his return, he is ordered to proceed to the United Kingdom for reparation to the USA. He embarks for England from Dunkirk on the 2nd February 1919. .He was transferred to “Z” class reserves on the 21st June 1919. Emile did not qualify for a pension or gratuity. After his discharge from the army, he moved to Maine in the USA where his mother resided.13 Emile Cyr was awarded the British War Medal and the British Victory Medal.

13th March 1917

Private 1685 William Charles Gordon, Australian Imperial Force. Taken on Strength by 19th Battalion, Ex 56th Battalion Reinforcements. In July he is transferred to the 5th Light Trench Mortar Battery. Wounded in Action he survives the War. William was born in Seattle, USA.14

Private 2763 Walter Summerton, Walter was born at Crystal City, Missouri, USA. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. As his place of birth, he gave his parent’s address, Settler, Alberta, and his occupation as Labourer. Now ex 12th Training Battalion he is embarking for France from Folkestone. The following day he will join 4 Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples. Marched out to join his unit on the 17th. He joins 46th Battalion in the Field on the 18th. At first, he was presumed killed in action on the 11th April, but on the 7th of May, he is listed on the Prisoner of War List P.M 116. He died while a Prisoner of War in Senna Germany on the 28th October 1918. Walter, age 31, was the son of John and Annie Elizabeth Summerton. He is buried in Niederzwehren Cemetery Kassel, Hessen, Germany.15

13th April 1917

Sapper 16219. Alexander Charles McDermott16, Australian Imperial Forces, he arrived at Australian General Base Depot the next day. Joined 12th Field Company Australian Engineers, in the Field, on the 27th April. Alexander Charles McDermott, born on Rhode Island, USA. Alexander enlisted at Melbourne, Australia, and survived the war.

19th April 1917

Private 1025 James Thomas Donnelly, 1st Reinforcements/41st Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, Ex-11th Training Battalion Larkhill. He is Taken on Strength of 41st Battalion, ex 3rd Australian Division Base Camp on the 10th May. James was born in Colorado, USA, and enlisted at Brisbane Queensland, Australia, in February 1916.17

25th April 1917

Private 2815 Mayo Carlton Clark, Australian Imperial Force, he arrives at 4th Australian Division Base Camp the following day. Taken on the strength of 4th Pioneer Battalion ex-6th Reinforcements/4th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, on the 16th May 1917. Mayo was born near Denver, Colorado, USA. Married to Jane Reid of New Zealand, his mother lived in Brisbane, Queensland Australia. He enlisted on the 10th January 1916 in Brisbane. Hospitalised in July 1918 suffering from Trench Fever.18

9th May 1917

Lance-Sergeant 1145 George Joseph Richard Brown M.M., 28th Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Returning to the front after being wounded. George joins the Australian General Base Depot the following day. Marched out to 3rd Australian Division Artillery, Rouillers, on the 2nd June. He is taken on Strength, Division Trench Mortars, 6th June. Transferred to, and taken on strength of 28th Infantry Battalion on the 10th August. George is killed in Action on the 4th October 1917. George was the son of George and Mary Brown, born in Concord, Northampshire, USA. He was married to Alice Oliver Brown who lived at, 129 Brighton Road, Surbiton. His Military Medal was Gazetted on the 27th October 1916:
“HIS MAJESTY THE KING has been graciously pleased to award the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to the undermentioned non-commissioned officer:- No. 1145 Corporal GEORGE JOSEPH RICHARD BROWN.”
George has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate.19

14th May 1917

Private 3156 Earle Nelson Gates,20 ex 15th Training Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Taken on Strength 57th Battalion ex 8th Reinforcements/57th Battalion. Born in Allegahanny City, Pennsylvania USA, enlisted in Broadmeadows, Victoria, Australia on the 17th October 1916.

Private 6948 Albert Fred Hass, ex 3rd Training Battalion, 10th Battalion. Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force. The son of Peter Heinrich Hass, of Peterborough, South Australia, and the late Lisette Hass (nee Lohmann). Born in Greenville, Wisconsin, U.S.A. He was killed in action between the 20th and 21st September, Aged 24. and has no known grave. His brother, Walter Theodor Hass also of the Australian Imperial Force was also killed in action and also has no known grave. Both are commemorated on the Menin Gate.21

30th May 1917

No.5 Base Hospital US Army. Marched down Slopes Road, now known as the Road of Remembrance. They “crossed the Channel in a crowded packet in a dense fog, surrounded by growling destroyers we could not see,”22 Crossed to Boulogne on the SS Princess Victoria. They take over the British Expeditionary Force General Hospital No.11, situated between Dannes and Camiers. Serving with the No5. Base Hospital is Lieutenant William Fitzsimmons, Private Oscar C Tugo and, Miss Eva Parmelee. William Fitsimmons will become the first American, in the American Expeditionary Force, to be killed by enemy action in the Great War. He is killed in an air raid on the Base Hospital on the 4th September 1917. Oscar Tugo is also killed in the air raid. He is the first American enlisted man in the American Expeditionary Force to be killed by enemy action. Eva Parmelee is on duty during the air raid. Escaping with only minor injuries despite her dress being holed by shrapnel, remained at her post. Throughout the raid Eva stayed calm, she collected, cared for, and comforted both the newly wounded and others. For her actions during the raid, General Pershing gave her an honorary mention and King George V presented her with the first Military Medal awarded to an American nurse.23 Other accounts record Eva being awarded the American Distinguished Service Cross.24 25

(More American Units marched down Slope Road (The Road of Remembrance) than Canadian and possibly British Units.)

29th June 1917

Mr Mowry of the American Bolling’s Aeronautical Commission to Europe, and 63 men from the Civilian Motor Mechanics Group. The Group were in Europe to study British and French aircraft production techniques.26

13th June 1917

U.S. General “Black” Jack Pershing.27 He crossed on the SS Invicta. Shortly after their arrival General Pershing’s aide, Colonel Charles Stanton, on the 4th July 1917 made the following remark, “Nous voila, Lafayette” (Lafayette, we are here!“) at Lafayette’s tomb.

8th August 1917.

11th Engineers Regiment, (Railway),28 an American regiment raised from railway workers. They were sent over to France to help maintain the railways in Northern France. Sergeant Matthew Calderwood and Private William Branigan were wounded when the Unit came under shell fire on the 5th September 1917. They were the first United States Army casualties on the Western Front. 29

17th September 1917

Private M/322950.Victor Holman, Army Service Corps. Posted to 974 Motor Transport Company, 5th Heavy Repair Shop. Victor stated he was born near Colorado in the USA. Attested on the 1st September 1914 and gave his age as 19yrs and 345 days. He had served in France before. Embarked from Southampton when serving with the Kings Royal Rifles as Private Y861, in October 1915. Then he was sent back to England, on the 28th March 1917, for being “Under Age”.30

1st March 1918

Corporal 374A Thomas Oscar Miller, Australian Imperial Forces. Ex-Machine Gun Training Depot, Grantham. Returning to France, he arrived at the Machine Gun Base Depot, Camiers the next day. Rejoining the 21st Machine Gun Company in the Field on the 7th March. On the 1st April 1918, the 21st Machine Gun Company’s designation is changed to the 1st Machine Gun Battalion. Thomas Oscar Miller, born in Boston, USA. Enlisted in Adelaide, Australia. He survived the war.31

15th April 1918

Private 6765 Arthur Henry Banninger, Australian Imperial Force, Ex-20th Reinforcements/24th Battalion. Arrived at New Zealand Base Depot on the 17th. He is taken on strength of 24th Battalion on the 26th April 1918. Born in Hanover, Washington County, Kansas, USA. Wounded in action in July 1918, he survives the war.32

Private 3241 Richard William England, Australian Imperial Force, ex-9th Training Battalion. Marches into No.3 Base Depot, Etaples two days later. He is taken on Strength 40th Battalion, ex 7th Reinforcements/40th Battalion on the 26th April. Richard was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. He enlisted in Claremont, Tasmania. On the 9th November 1916.33

Private 6904 Gustav Albert Mahle, Ex 6th Training Battalion. Australian Imperial Force. He arrived at the New Zealand Base Depot on the 17th. Taken on the strength of 23rd Battalion ex (20) reinforcements on the 20th April. Born in Mobile Alabama, USA. Gustav was an American Subject who lived with his wife, Kathleen Monica Mahle, in Richmond, Victoria, Australia. Wounded in action he survived the war.34

2nd June 1918

Company B, 311th US Infantry. The 311th had crossed from the USA on the “Nestor”. After arriving at Liverpool they entrained for Folkestone arriving at 2 a.m. on the 1st June. The history of Company B, 311 Infantry records they spent the night in an Embarkation Camp at Folkestone in “a large empty stone house in a row of similar ones” Sixty men from the 311th had left for France from Folkestone on the 1st June.35

8th July 1918

Private 3629 Norman Crumpler Frederick. Born in Key West Florida USA he became a farmer and lived with or near his parents in Victoria Australia. He enlisted on the 2nd of December 1917. Now he is part of the 10th Reinforcements/57th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Taken on Strength by 57th Battalion on the 24th. Wounded in Action on the 2nd of September 1918. Six months later on the 3rd March 1919, Norman is detached from the 57th Battalion for duty with the Australian Graves Registration Unit.36

15th July 1918

Private 7026 Daniel H Burchfield, Australian Imperial Force. An American born in Tennessee enlisted on the 31st October 1917. He Arrived at the Australian Infantry Base Depot Harve on the 18th. Marched out to the 45th Battalion the next day. Transferred to the 34th Battalion from the 45th ex Australian Infantry Base Depot and Taken on Strength by the 34th on the 21st July. Wounded in Action on the 8th August 1918. A Gun Shot Wound to the heart. He is transferred through the evacuation train back to England via 5 General Hospital, Rouen. He dies from his wound on the 18th of November 1918. He is buried in Brookwood Military Cemetery. Daniel is probably the Daniel Horatio (Sp?) Burchfield in Knoxville Tennessee. There seems to be a close match in signatures, as well as in name.37

29th July 1918

Private 7958 William Robert Christian38. Born 9th September 1895 in Leadville, Colorado, the son of Evan and Sarah Christian, he is an American Citizen. William enlisted in Tasmania, where he lived with his wife, in October 1917. After basic training, he embarked from Australia for Liverpool on the 28th February 1918 and joined the 1st Training Battalion at Sutton Veny on the 20th April. Taken on Strength by 12th Battalion ex 27th Reinforcements 4th August 1918. Wounded in Action, Wounds caused by a shell, back and legs. On the 26th of August. He died from the wounds on the 30th August at 41st Casualty Clearing Station. Buried at Daours Communal Cemetery Extension. The inscription on his grave reads:

“HE DIED DOING HIS DUTY MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE”

8th August 1918

Private 7378 Ernest Thompson, Australian Imperial Force, ex 12th Training Battalion. He arrived at the Australian Infantry Base Depot the next day. Taken on Strength by 51st Battalion on the 16th August. Ernest was born in Omaha, USA. An American subject he enlisted in Narrogin, Western Australia, on the 18th December 1917. He survived the war.39

30th August 1918

Driver 16202 Isard Zeltner, Australian Imperial Force, he arrived at the Australian General Base Depot on the 1st September. Joined 3rd Motor Transport Company, ex Australian General Base Depot on the 5th September. Born in St Louis, Missouri, an American Subject. He enlisted on the 26th November 1917 at Melbourne Australia.40
8th August 1917.

“Nous voila, Lafayette”.
Americans also stayed at No.3 Rest Camp on the Leas before marching down Slope Road to the harbour and the ships waiting to take them to France. Two soldiers from the United states 11th Engineering Regiment (Railways) who were to become the first casualties from the A.E.F. were at the rest camp on the Leas. There is also another almost forgotten connection with the United States.
The United States is well known for the respect Americans pay to their war dead. American Great War Cemeteries are impressive places. They are very proud of the role their soldiers played. Yet there is a lost almost forgotten army of American dead. Those that fought in other nations uniforms. They are buried in cemeteries all over the world and ignored by Americans. For some the connection to the United States begs the question of, how do we define nationality, and does it matter? Others there is no doubt of their nationality. These are the Folkestone/Shorncliffe dead with an American connection. All are buried in Shorncliffe Military Cemetery, all are listed in The Foreign Burial of American War Dead by Chris Dickon.

IMG_8054
James Desmond McNulty Born in Valley City, North Dakota. killed in the Air Raid 25th May 1917.

IMG_8051

John Lucius Rumsdell The husband of Letitia M Ramsdell, Brooklyn New York.

IMG_8049
George Bates, Son of Norman and Sally Bates of Arkansas. Served in Mexico, presumably with the US Army. Married and lived with his wife in Vancouver. After his enlistment, his wife moved to North Wales.

IMG_8047
David Gordon, died of wounds received in France. Born in Belfast, he was the son of James Gordon of 1 Bunker Hill Court, Charleston, West Virginia.

IMG_8046
Ottawa Gladman, Born in Canada and lived in Chicago. Died of Meningitis.

IMG_8045
Charley Hanson, Born in Norway, lived in Saskatchewan, married to Caroline Hanson of Fairchild Wisconsin, USA. Dad to six children. Charley had arrived in England on the SS Scandinavian. on the 5th of February 1917. He died from an illness.

IMG_8044
David Gray, Married to Annie Gray of Detroit, Michigan. Wounded on the Somme, he died at Manor Court Hospital, Folkestone.

IMG_8043
Bert Arbuckle, Born in Indiana. Injured in the air raid on the 25th May 1917, he died of wounds the next day.

IMG_8042

George Wheeler Armstrong.An American Eagle of the First World War. lots of references to the Americans who flew in the Lafayette Escadrille, few for those who flew with the RAF during the war. Born in the US Virgin Islands. Died in an accident while flying a Bristol F2b.

Also at  Shorncliffe Military Cemetery is the grave of May Arnold. A victim of the Folkestone Air Raid in May 1917. May’s husband was Freddie Arnald an American serving in the Canadian Army. Freddie was executed, by the British Army, for desertion on the 27th July 1916 at Le Portel. He is possibly the only American executed by the British in the First World War.

img_8221May Arnold’s grave.

Addendum

Other notable Americans who embarked from Folkestone in the First World War include:

Richard Norton1 Founder of the American Volunteer Motor-Ambulance Corps, also known as the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps, embarked 20th October 1914,(Arlen Hanson, Gentlemen Volunteers, New York: Arcade, 1996. quoted in, http://www.ourstory.info/2/a/Norton.html accessed 10/02/2018) and Glenna Lindsey Bigelow, an American who was living near Liege Belgium. Embarking for Calais. Glenna worked as a nurse throughout the war. Embarked on the 9th of November. (Liege on the line of March, Glenna Lindsey Bigelow, John Lane Company 1918.)

Footnotes.

1a) Unpublished article by Peter Anderson.
1b)In War’s Wake, 1914-1915; the Rockefeller Foundation and the American Red Cross Join in Civilian Relief by Ernest Percy Bicknell. Hathi Trust Digital Library online 12/01/2019.
2)Page 205 The Harvard Volunteers in Europe Edit by M.A. DeWolf Howe, Cambridge Harvard University Press. 1916
3)In War’s Wake, 1914-1915; the Rockefeller Foundation and the American Red Cross Join in Civilian Relief by Ernest Percy Bicknell. Hathi Trust Digital Library online 12/01/2019.
4)Frederick J Felton’s Medal Card.
5)Fredrick J Felton’s Army Pension Record, and his listing on the CWGC Website.
6)Charles Lathorp Gray’s Army Service Record.
7)Albert and Walter Hass Army Service Records and CWGC Web page.
8)Arthur Jones’s Service Record.
9)George Bowden Army Service Record.
10)James Albert Phillips Army Service Record.
11)Richard Lindop’s Army Service Record. And listing on the CWGC Website.
12)Francisco Aceituno Army Service Record.
13)Emile Cyr Army Pension Records.
14)William Charles Gordon’s Army Service Record.
15)Walter Summerton’s Army service record and Medal Card,
16)Alexander Charles McDermott’s Army Service Record.
17)James Thomas Donnelly’s Army Service Record.
18)Mayo Carlton Clark, Army Service Record.
19)George Joseph Richard Brown’s Army Service Record and his CWGC Website Listing
20)Earle Nelson Gates’s Army Service Record.
21)Albert and Walter Hass Army Service Records and CWGC Web page.
22)The story of U.S. Army base hospital no. 5, web retrieved 05/04/2017

23)http://www.ourstory.info/library/2-ww1/hospitals/bh5a.html retrieved 12/91/2019
24)http://www.thefamilyparmelee.com/f-x01-0500evajean-nurse.html
25)http://userpages.aug.com/captbarb/medals.html
26)Gorrell’s History AEF Air Service Sheet 8 History of Bolling’s Mechanics
27)Yanks, by John S.D. Eisenhower, and, http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/arrival.htm
28)Jones, Raymond W , WW1 Officer Experience Reports AEF
29)http://www.webmatters.net/france/ww1_cambrai_us.htm 95/05/2016
30)Victor Holman’s Army Service Record.
31)Thomas Oscar Miller’s Army Service Record.
32)Arthur Henry Banninger’s Army Service Record.
33)Richard William England’s Army Service Record.
34)Gustav Albert Mahle’s Army Service Record.
35)Pages 14-15 The history of Company B, 311th infantry, in the world war. Edited … Colonna, Benjamin Allison. Hathi Trust online book, 04/02/18
36)Norman Crumpler Frederick’s Army Service Record.
37)Daniel H Burchfield, Army Service Record, Tennessee Draft card on Fold3, CWGC web listing.

38)William Robert Christian’s Army Service Record and CWGC listing.
39)Ernest Thompson’s Army Service Record.

40)Isard Zeltner’s Army Service Record.

 

Advertisements

Folkestone’s #FWW Myths

The Myth the British Army left from Folkestone in 1914.

The Myth, Millions marched down The Road of Remembrance, (the Slope Road)

The Myth, The Harbour Cafe’s visitors book was signed by soldiers going to France.

The Myth, All soldiers left from Folkestone.

The Myth, Ten Million left from Folkestone.

The Myth, you could hear the guns firing in France.

Myth, a Mothers last Kiss, the story of William Francis Poile 26th Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

The Old Contemptables left from Southampton. Folkestone was not a military port until the end of March 1915.

Tens of thousands, not hundreds of thousands, let alone millions marched UP as well as down the Slope Road, (The Road of Remembrance). Most soldiers arrived at the harbour by train.

By no means did all soldiers embark from Folkestone. Avonmouth, Dover, Ramsgate, as well as other ports were used to embark troops for France.

Ten million is more than there were soldiers in the Army. The true number may never be known, but 2-3 million is a better estimate.

If all the British army’s artillery fired at exactly the same time a slight rumble might have been heard.

William Francis Poile. The 26th Battalion Royal Fusiliers embarked from Southampton, not Folkestone (War Diary). If he was part of a draft he would have arrived at the harbour by train. No time to see anyone. Not possible for a civilian to get to the train. No time to go and visit his Mother who lived in Stelling Minnis, not Folkestone. A lovely story but a myth.

A few true odds and sods.

More American Units march down the Slope Road than Canadian Units did. Although more Canadian units embarked from Folkestone than American Units.

Canadian Units marched from Shorncliffe down the Military Road and along the LOWER Sandgate Road.

Churchill, Sassoon and Walter Tull were all at the Harbour on the same day.

One soldier who embarked at Folkestone served in the British, then French, and finally in the American army before the end of the war.

 

Four From October #FWW Embarkations from #Folkestone

It is actually to remind me I am on page 750 of my notes. All four are little known. The notes on each short.

From October 1915.

Private 111020 Kennedy Gideon Francis Baldwin 6th Canadian Mounted Rifles. Born in Bathurst, New Brunswick, Canada. His parents are recorded by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as John E. and Annie W. Baldwin, of 11, Tetlow St., Boston, Mass., U.S.A. Although his attestation papers give an address in New Brunswick for his mother. Known to have been at Shorncliffe, he was temporarily promoted to Acting Lance Corporal while there. He reverted to Private before going to France. Transferred to 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles on the 2nd January 1916. Promoted to Corporal in the field on the 17th November 1915. He is killed in action on the 2nd June 1916. Corporal 111020 Kennedy Gideon Francis Baldwin is buried in Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium.

1916

Private 27964 Thomas Smith, The Royal Scots. Returning to France after being Shell Shocked. He had first embarked from Folkestone on the 7th June. This time he joins 20th Infantry Base Depot on the 12th posted to the 13th Battalion.. On the 27th October he is posted from 20th Infantry Base to the 16th Battalion and joins the Battalion in the Field on the 1st November. Reported missing on the 28th April 1917 and a Prisoner of War from the same day on the 4th September 1917. Thomas, age 22, the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Smith, of 20, Marketgate, Arbroath, Forfarshire dies on the 11th December 1918 while a Prisoner of War at Lumburg in Germany. He is buried at Berlin South-Western Cemetery.

1917

Private 108436 Narcissus Walker, Machine Gun Corps. Narcissus attested on the 10th December 1915 in the King’s Royal Rifles and was posted to the reserves the next day. It was not until the 1st May 1917 that he was Mobilised and posted to the Depot at Winchester. On the 2nd August 1917 he is transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. Embarking for France at Folkestone on the 8th October he joins the Machine Gun Corps Base Depot at Camiers the next day. Posted to 237 Company Machine Gun Corps he joins them in the Field on the 11th October. Narcissus is buried by a shell explosion on the 7 November 1917 and injures his head. Evacuated via the casualty evacuation train back to England he is discharged as physically unfit for war service in June 1918

1918.

Private 33481 Edward Nolan, Grenadier Guards. Edward Nolan married Mary Jane Bradburn on the 7th March 1914. They were to have three children before the end of hostilities, John born 4th February 1914, Frances born 23rd August 1915, and, Walter born 29th June 1917. Before Nolan enlisted on the 10th December 1915 he was a Police Constable. At first he was posted to the Army reserves and not mobilised until the 25th April 1918. Nolan was posted to the 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards on the 29th October 1918 the same day he embarked from Folkestone to Boulogne. Nolan at first joined the Guards Division Base Depot on the 31st October 1918. The next day he was with the 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards at the front. He returned to the UK with the Battalion from Dunkirk on the 4th March 1919. On the 12th April 1919 Nolan was demobilised and transferred to the reserves. He was discharged from the reserves 31st March 1920. Edward Nolan was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Four From September #FWW Folkestone.

All for men embarked from Folkestone inSeptember

From September 1915.

Captain John Macgregor V.C., M.C and Bar. D.C.M. 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles. Born in Cawdor, in Nairnshire Scotland, John Macgregor would have made a worthy thane. His mother still lived at Newlands of Murchang, Cawdor. Prior to the war John had emigrated to Canada where he worked as a carpenter.1 Macgregor was awarded the D.C.M. For an action on the 8th April 1917 during the preliminaries to the Battle of Vimy. 2 The citation for his Distinguished Conduct Medal (awarded when John was a Sergeant) reads:

“116031 Sjt. J. MacGregor, Mounted Rifles. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He single-handed captured an enemy machine gun and shot the crew, thereby undoubtedly saving his company from many casualties.”3
(Supplement 30204 to The London Gazette 24 July 1917 page 7663)

John was awarded his Military cross for two reconnaissance missions on the 28th December 1917, and for his part in a trench raid on the 12th January 1918. 4 The Citation for his Military Cross reads:

“Lt. John Macgregor, D.C.M., Mtd. Rif. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Whilst he was assembling his men prior to a raid, the enemy bombed the trench. He, however, changing his point of attack, led his men over the wire into the enemy’s trench, and successfully dealt with the garrison of the trench and three concrete dug-outs, himself capturing one prisoner. He then withdrew his party and his prisoner successfully to our trenches. Before the raid he, together with a serjeant, had made several skilful and daring reconnaissances along the enemy wire, which materially assisted in the success of the enterprise.”
(Supplement 30845 to The London Gazette, 13 August 1918, page 9569.)

The citation for the award of the Victoria Cross:

T./Capt. John MacGregor, M.C., D.C.M., 2nd C.M.R. Bn., 1st Central Ontario Regiment. For most conspicuous bravery, leadership and self-sacrificing devotion to duty near Cambrai from 29th September to 3rd October 1918. He led his company under intense fire, and when the advance was checked by machine guns, although wounded, pushed on and located the enemy guns. He then ran forward in broad daylight, in face of heavy fire from all directions, and. with rifle and bayonet, single-handed, put the enemy crews out of action, killing four and taking eight prisoners. His prompt action saved many casualties and enabled the advance to continue. After reorganising his command under heavy fire he rendered most useful support to neighbouring troops. When the enemy were showing stubborn resistance, he went along the line regardless of danger, organised the platoons, took command of the leading waves, and continued the advance. Later, after a personal daylight reconnaissance under heavy fire, he established his company in Neuville St. Remy, thereby greatly assisting the advance into Tilloy. Throughout the operations Capt. MacGregor displayed magnificent bravery and heroic leadership.
(The Edinburgh Gazette .10 January 1919, No. 13384 page 200) 5

The citation for the bar to his Military Cross reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and leadership from 5th to 8th November, 1918, at Quievrain and Quievrechain. Through his initiative the bridges over the Honnelle River were secured. His personal reconnaissances and the information he derived from them were of great use to his commanding officer. His prompt action in seizing the crossings over the river did much -towards the final rout of the enemy.
(Supplement 31680 to the London Gazette, 9 December 1919, page15312)

John Macgregor died in British Columbia on the 9th June 1952.

From September 1916

Private 13790 John Weir, who had attested on the 9th September 1914. He first embarked from Folkestone on the 10th July with his battalion, the 10th (Service) Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) A K2 Battalion, which was part of 46th Brigade 15th Division. They had arrived in Folkestone at 10:45 pm. and embarked on the S.S. Victoria. Within days of his arrival at the front he forfeits 3 days pay, then on the 15th. In August 1915 he was awarded 6 days Field Punishment No.2. On the 25th September 1915 he was wounded, a gun shot wound to the back. On the 27th he was sent back to England. John is now returning to France. He is transferred to the 11th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles on the 20th October with a new Regimental Number, 40271, and joins them in the field on the 30th. Awarded 7 days Field Punishment No.2 on the 21st November he is posted to the 8th Battalion on the 2nd December. Illness/sickness sees John in and out of the Field Ambulance until finally he is transferred back to England on the 10th May 1917. He is discharged on the 15th March 1918 as no longer physically fit for war service. His Pension Record is stamped “Deceased” but no date is given. There is also no indication of an award of a pension either although his length of qualifying service for a pension is given.

September 1917

Private 208995 Arthur Crabb, Labour Corps. Arthur Crabb was called up a month before his 39th Birthday the last week of June 1917. Posted to France he embarked from Folkestone on the 8th September. For five days he was at the Labour Corps Base Depot before being posted to 744 Employment Company, Scottish Command Labour Centre. It is thought that this company was involved with battlefield salvage. Five months later on the 19th February 1918, he is admitted to 16 Field Ambulance with Epilepsy. Admitted to 45 Casualty Clearing Station the same day and No.1 (Australian?) General Hospital Rouen on the 22nd. He is also discharged to duty on the same day by the Medical Board at Rouen. . Less than three weeks later on the 10th March he is a admitted to 49 Casualty Clearing Station with Epilepsy. This time he is taken by Ambulance Transport No. 6 to 5 General Hospital Rouen and back to Southampton on the Hospital Ship Carisbrooke Castle 16th March 1918. His Medical Report on the 26th April records that Crabb had epileptic fits all his life. The record also states “he is very deaf and dense, with weak general intelligent.”. Makes one wonder why he was enlisted in the first place. On the 1st May 1918 Crabb is recommended for discharge. He is discharged on 17th June, no longer fit for war work. He is given a weekly allowance of just over 8 shillings (40 pence) for 30 weeks.1 Arthur Crabb is awarded the British War Medal, Victory Medal, and the Silver War Badge.

…and one who embarked in September 1918.

Gunner 28312 William Penniston Gallup, Australian Imperial Force. Born in Pueblo, Colorado, USA, and became a naturalized Australian on the 2nd June 1914. first crossed to France from Folkestone on the 6th June 1917, then he arrived at the Australian General Base Depot on the 9th June 1917. He was Taken on Strength of 6th (Army) Brigade, Australian Field Artillery on the 21st June and posted to 17th Battery. Wounded in action on the 22nd March 1918, he was sent back to England. He is now returning, and rejoins 6th Brigade, ex-wounded, on the 28th September. William survives the war and is known to have been still alive in the early 1940s.

Four and a Company, from Folkestone in the FWW, June.

The connection between the four people who embarked from Folkestone in the First World War is “June”, as is the connection with the Company.

The first man, embarked on the last day of May 1915. The poem was published in June.

Charles Hamilton Sorley crossed with the 7th Battalion the Suffolk Regiment. He would be killed in action on the 13th October 1915.

Cast away regret and rue,
Think what you are marching to,
Little give, great pass.
Jesus Christ and Barabbas
Were found the same day.
This died, that, and went his way
So sing with joyful breath.
For why you are going to death.
Teeming earth will surely store
all the gladness that you pour.
(From, Over the Hills and Vales Along, by Charles Hamilton Sorley, June 1915)

Robert Graves in “Goodbye To All That”, describes Charles Sorley as, “one of the three poets of importance killed during the war. (the other two were Isaac Rosenberg and Wilfred Owen.) Charles did mention the Folkestone-Boulogne crossing. Not in a poem but in prose,
“I hate the growing tendency to think that every man drops overboard his individuality between Folkestone and Boulogne, and becomes on landing either ‘Tommy’ with a character like a nice big fighting pet bear and an incurable yearning and whining for mouth-organs and cheap cigarettes: or the Young Officer with a face like a hero and a silly habit of giggling in the face of death.”

From the 28th June 1915

Mary Dexter. Mary wrote to her mother on her arrival at the Ambulance Jeanne d’ Arc in Calais on the June 28, 1915, 4 P.M.
“Dearest Little Mother:- Here I am, safely over-after a rough crossing. There were only a dozen soldiers onboard-British and Belgian-returning to the Front-and I was the only woman. The fuss to get off from Folkestone,-armed with a passport and forty permits and passes for going through Belgium lines!”

From the 29th June 1916

Private 414 John William Wheatman, K Company, 2nd R.B.S.A.S. Scottish (2nd Reserve Battalion South African Scottish) embarked on the “Golden Eagle”. He joined 9 Infantry Base Depot on the 30th. Promoted to unpaid Lance Corporal in the field on the 13th September. Wounded in action on the 12th October. He returned to France from Southampton on the 13th May 1917 rejoining his unit a month later. Wounded in action in August 1917 he is transferred back to England in September. Discharged at Bordon in the United Kingdom on the 20th May 1918. John from Hammersmith in London, had enlisted at Potchefstroom, South Africa on the 16th August 1915 in the 4th South African Infantry. On his attestation papers he gives his wife’s name and address as, Margaret Wheatman, PO New Primrose Germiston. A city in the East Rand, South Africa. His Award Sheet disablement pension, records his wife’s maiden name as “Clara Elizabeth Kitchen”. John had served for 4 and a half years in the East Lancashire Regiment and for a year in the South African Police. On his discharge papers alongside Campaigns, Medals and Decorations he has written, German South West Africa 1914-15, and France 1916 and 1917. His Military History Sheet records his service as;
Home 9-8-15 to 24-9-15
En route 25-9-15 to 12-10-15
England 13-10-15 to 28-6-16
France 29-6-16 to 20-10-16
England 21-10-16 to 13-5-17
France 14-5-17 to 25-9-17
England 26-9-17 to 20-5-18

4th June 1917

Corporal 7227 Alexander James Dean ex-4th Training Battalion Now 24th Reinforcements for 15th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born in Advie, Scotland, Alexander had settled in Australia where he was married with 5 children. He decided to enlist on the 3rd August 1916. Twice wounded in July 1917, the second time self inflicted. Alexander is discharged from the Australian Imperial Force because of defective vision on the 22nd December 1917.

2nd June 1918

Company B, 311th US Infantry. The 311th had crossed from the USA on the “Nestor”. After arriving at Liverpool they entrained for Folkestone arriving at 2 a.m. on the 1st June. They history of Company B, 311 Infantry records they spent the night in an Embarkation Camp at Folkestone in “a large empty stone house in a row of similar ones” Sixty men from the 311th had left for France from Folkestone on the 1st June.

 

 

Four From May Embarkations from Folkestone #FWW

Four men who embarked from Folkestone. One from each year 1915-1918.

1915.

No. S/1456, Donald Fraser, Piper.
7th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany’s)
Killed in action, 25th September 1915, age 27.

Donald Fraser was born in Nethy Bridge the son of Donald and May Fraser of Station Cottages, Blair Athol, Perthshire. Nephew of Mr and Mrs Gordon of Ardverikie, Kinguissie. He enlisted at Fort George. Donald arrived in France on the 10th of May 1915 with his battalion. In the 7th Battalion Pipers piped the soldiers into the attack. and Donald was killed in action during the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt by the 7th, in the Battle of Loos. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British War Medal, and the Victory Medal. He was one of five pipers from the 7th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders killed, or dying of wounds, during the battle.

Today brings back sad memories,
Of one who was called to rest,
And those who think of him today,
Are those who loved him best.
(In Memoriam, Strathspey Herald. Date unknown (1921?)
Inserted by his Aunt, Uncle and Cousins at Ardverkie) 1 2 3WW

1916

27th May 1916

Private 21860 Walter Abson, York and Lancaster Regiment. Walter Abson lived in Bolton on Dearne. He attests at Pontefact on the 7th December 1915 and is posted to the reserves. He is mobilised 2 months later on the 8th February 1916, and posted to the 11th (Reserve) battalion before being posted to France. He embarked from Folkestone on the 27th May 1916. Absom joined the 8th Battalion in the field on the 23rd June. Just over a week later on the 2nd July he received a gun shot wound to the back and is admitted to No.3 casualty clearing station. After treatment at Le Treport he is sent back to England on the Hospital Ship St David He spends 40 days in Wharncliffe War Hospital in Sheffield. On his release from hospital he is posted to the 3rd (Reserve) battalion at Sunderland. Three months later on the 7th December he is posted back to France and again embarks from Folkestone. He spends the first three days at 34 Infantry Brigade Depot before joining the 2nd Battalion. Around the middle of December (15th?) Abson is admitted to 2/1 (London?) Field Ambulance, followed by 42 Casualty Clearing Station and then by Hospital Ship to England. He is taken to Naunton Hospital, Cheltenham, and spends 57 days there. On the 4th March 1918 he is posted back to 3rd Battalion at Sunderland. The following month he is again posted to France and again embarks from Folkestone. This time on the 13th April. He spends five days at the 34th Infantry Brigade Depot at Etaples before joining 13th Battalion in the field. He is transferred to the “Z” Reserves and demobilised on the 15th February 1919.

May 1917

16th May 1917

Private 226113 Harold Ralph Laidler, 9th Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment. Harold Ralph Laidler enlisted on the 8th April 1915. On the 16th May 1917 he embarks for Boulogne from Folkestone. Laidler arrives at the 15th Infantry Brigade Depot the next day. The 10th June 1917 sees him posted to the 5th Reserve Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment, and later that day posted to the 6th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment. He is appointed unpaid lance Corporal six days later on the 16th June 1917. On the 22nd September 1917 Laidler is wounded in action. Gun shot would to left buttock, left knee and the left calf. In Laidler’s Pension Record, the gun shot wound to the left calf is described as trivial in nature. He reverts to the rank of private when he is transferred to England on the 7th October 1917. On the 1st January 1918 Laidler is posted to the Reserve Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment. Later in March 1918 he breaks his left leg during training. Laidler’s broken leg is treated in the 2nd Eastern General Hospital Brighton. He is posted to the 9th Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment on the 6th August 1918. Laidler is demobilised on 17th February 1919.

May 1918

6th May 1918

Private 3290 Charles Ambrose De Leon, Australian Imperial Force marched into the New Zealand Base Depot the following day. He is taken on the strength of 38th Battalion ex 8th Re-enforcements 38th Battalion on the 9th May. Charles was born in New York in 1888, he enlisted at Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, in December 1917. Accidentally injured on the 24th July 1918. At the Court of enquiry a witness gave the following statement. Report on No. 3290. Pte De Leon C.A. (Burnt about the face and hands)
“On 24th July last, Pte De Leon was on outpost duty when the company was holding the line in the Hamel sector The enemy was shelling very heavily in the region of his post, and a fragment of one shell hit one phosphorus bomb which was amongst some Mills grenades. The phosphorus bomb burst into flames and De leon who was standing close to the parapet where it burst was burnt about the face and hands, also his clothing and equipment was burnt. Lieut Baxter after the flames were extinguished ordered De Leon to proceed to the Aid Post”
(Sgd) Pte F Binion No. 598.
Charles returned to his unit on the 11th October 1918

Australians, Embarking from Folkestone. #FWW

I collect stories about the soldiers who embarked from Folkestone in the First World War. Some apart from their name I know nothing about. Others a wee bit more. All of these soldiers served in the Australian Imperial Force. All embarked at the Harbour Arm on the 25th April 1917. Some were killed in action. Some survived the war. Some have no known graves others have known graves. At least two could claim to be Americans by birth. One from San Francisco, the other from Colorado.

Private 4632 Roy Arthur, ex 8th Training Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Part of 12th Reinforcements 30th Battalion. Marched into 5 Australian Division Base Depot on the 26th, and joined 30th Battalion in the Field on the 30th April.2

Private 2537 Arthur James Beal, ex 11th Training Battalion Australian Imperial Force, part of part of 5th reinforcement 43rd Battalion.3

Private 6286 James Jack Brown, ex 5th Training Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, part of 18th Reinforcements 20th Battalion. Joined 20th Battalion in the Field on the 2nd May 1917, and is killed in action on the 27th April 1918.4 James was the son of Emily Brown, Darling Street, Cowra, New South Wales, Australia, and George Brown. He was born in San Francisco, and is buried in Bouzincourt Ridge Cemetery, Albert. The inscription on his grave reads:
“IN MEMORY OF THE DEAR SON OF EMILY AND THE LATE GEORGE BROWN OF COWRA”

Private 2815 Mayo Carlton Clark, Australian Imperial Force, he arrives at 4th Australian Division Base Camp the following day. Taken on the strength of 4th Pioneer Battalion ex-6th Reinforcements/4th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, on the 16th May 1917. Mayo was born near Denver, Colorado, USA. Married to Jane Reid of New Zealand, his mother lived in Brisbane, Queensland Australia. He enlisted on the 10th January 1916 in Brisbane. Hospitalised in July 1918 suffering from Trench Fever.5

Private 2541 Charles Valentine Crichton, ex 10th Training Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, part of 5th Reinforcement 39th Battalion.6

Private 6977 David Maynard Crichton, Ex 2nd Training Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, part of 23rd Reinforcements/8th Battalion.7

Private 3200 Charles David Cunningham, Ex 14th Training Battalion Australian Imperial Force. Arrived at 5 Australian Division Base Depot the following day. Taken on Strength 54th Battalion ex 8th Reinforcements on the 13th May. Wounded in action on the 17th October.8

Corporal 3055 Edward Grant, 54th Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Edward, was born in Willesden near London and emigrated to Australia before the outbreak of war. He enlisted in the 10th Reinforcement 2nd Battalion on the 6th July 1915. Taking his oath of allegiance on the 12th Grant was taken on strength 2nd Battalion from the 10th/2nd at Tel-el Kebir 5th February 1916. Transferred to the 54th Battalion eleven days later. Appointed Lance Corporal while in Egypt on the 31st May 1916. The 54th sailed from Alexandria on the 19th June bound for Marseilles and the Western Front on the 19th June 1916. Grant is wounded in action on the 20th July.. He receives a gunshot wound to his right leg. He is admitted to No.2 Australian Casualty Clearing station the same day. From there he is sent via No.8 Stationary Hospital and the Hospital Ship St David to England. Admitted to the military Hospital at Edmington. He is to remain there for just over three weeks.. His first posting from Hospital is to No. 1 Command Depot. October No.3 Command Depot, beginning of November 1916 No.4 Command Depot. Three weeks later his Commanding Officer awards him 168 hours of detention and the forfeiture of 20 days pay for being in Absent Without Leave for 13 days. On the 5th December 1916 he was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital. The 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital. Is a V.D. Hospital for mainly Australian soldiers, Grant has syphilis. He spends the next 61 days in hospital. Three days after his discharge from hospital he is posted back to No.1 Australian Depot. It is now the 5th February 1917. On the 24th February Grant goes absent without leave. He returns at 6:45 pm on the 23rd March and forfeits 28 days pay. A month later he is posted overseas and returns to France via Folkestone on the 25th April. Spending just under a month at the 5th Australian Base Depot at Etaples he rejoins his unit, the 54th Battalion on the 20th May. Promoted Corporal on the 8th June. Grant must have been a reasonably good soldier. He is again wounded. He sprains his ankle, this time playing football. The 54th Battalion were playing the 53rd. His service record records, “ This man was injured in a Football Match between 53rd Bn and 54th Bn. At Beaulancourt on 13/6/17 He was not to blame.” He spends a day over a fortnight in hospital. Wounded in action on the 25th September, the 7th November his record has him listed as “Wounded and missing on the 25th September. It was decided by the court of enquiry on the 21st March 1918 that he was Killed in Action on the 25th.9Edward Grant has no known grave his name is recorded on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres.10

Private 3143 George Arthur Laidlaw, Australian Imperial Force. Arrived 5th Australian Base Depot ex10th Training Battalion the following day. Joined 54th Battalion Ex 8th Reinforcements/54th Battalion in the Field on the 13th May. Killed in Action 26th September 1917. George, the son of Mitchell and Alice Mary Laidlaw has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate.11

Private 7075 Frederick McCabe, Australian Imperial Forces, ex 23rd Reinforcements/2nd Battalion. Arrived at 1st Australian Base Depot the next day. Taken on Strength by the 2nd Battalion on the 11th May 1917. Frederick is killed in action on the 22nd September 1917. Private McCABE, FREDERICK 7075. Born in Sofalla, USA. The son of Son of James Warwick McCabe and Emily Maria McCabe, of Hudson St., Granville, New South Wales. Is buried at Buttes New British Cemetery, Polygon Wood. the inscription on his grave reads:12
“THOUGH LOST TO SIGHT TO MEMORY EVER DEAR”

Private 2362 John Crichton McLean, Australian Imperial Force, Ex 11th Training Battalion, part of the 4th Reinforcements for the 42nd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. John was born in Glasgow but his family had emigrated to Australia and John enlisted in Brisbane. He survived the war and returned to Australia.13

Private 7025 Andrew Edward McNair, 23rd Reinforcements/8th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Marched into 1st Australian Division Base Depot on the 26th. Taken on strength of 8th Battalion on the 13th May. He is killed in action on the 25th October 1917.

Fold3_Page_40

(from Fold3/Australian Archives)
Andrew Edward Henry McNair, 8th Battalion Australian Imperial Force. Killed in action age 27. The son of Son of Andrew Sneddon McNair and Lena McNair, of Morwell, Victoria, and a native of Melbourne. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate.

Private 2691 Herbert George Rider, Australian Imperial Force. Ex-9th Training Battalion. Taken on Strength 33rd Battalion, ex 5th Reinforcements/33rd Battalion on the 1st May.14